Monthly Simparica protects dogs from ticks and fleas for 35 days1

Have you ever been a few days late giving your dog monthly tick and flea protection? We get it. Simparica is a monthly tick and flea chewable that gives you a few days of extra wiggle room at the end of the month.1 Rest assured, your dog is protected (even if you’re a few days late giving the next dose).

Earn up to $35 in rewards from your Simparica purchase*


Why Simparica?

  • Protects dogs from ticks and fleas for 35 days1
  • Stays strong all month long, unlike some other products2-6
  • Starts killing ticks and fleas fast7†
  • Only monthly tick and flea chewable approved to kill 5 types of ticks, including the Gulf Coast tick
  • In a study, Simparica blocked transmission of Lyme disease from deer ticks to dogs8‡
  • FDA-approved and available at the vet’s office
  • Great-tasting chewable you give your dog once a month
  • Earn up to $35 in rewards with your Simparica purchase*

*Program Terms and Conditions apply.

Studies show that Simparica starts killing fleas in 3 hours and ticks in 8 hours.7

In a study, Simparica was shown to kill >98% of existing deer tick infestations within 12 hours. Lyme disease is typically transmitted in 24-48 hours.8

Why can't you give us a break, Simparica?
Zoetis Petcare Rewards

Earn up to $35 in rewards with your Simparica purchase*

girl with dog

The Simparica Difference: no dropoff in effectiveness at the end of the month, unlike some other products2‑6

Ticks and fleas don’t slow down at the end of the month. Your dog’s tick and flea protection shouldn’t either. Simparica starts—and stays—strong all month long.1

In a study, Simparica killed more brown dog ticks than NexGard

24 hours after infestation at day 283

Simparica or NexGard

In a study, Simparica killed more fleas than NexGard

8 hours and 12 hours after flea infestation at day 282

Simparica vs. NexGard

On day 28, NexGard performed above 90% starting at 12 hours, taking 4 more hours to match Simparica’s results. After 24 hours, NexGard caught up completely to Simparica, demonstrating 100% effectiveness at all time points.2

NexGard is a registered trademark of Merial.

woman on couch praising dog

Satisfaction Guarantee

  • FLEAS
  • TICKS
  • LYME DISEASE

We want you to be 100% satisfied with Simparica. We’ll work with you to make sure you’re satisfied with Simparica’s performance. If for any reason you’re still not completely happy, we’ll send you a replacement or give you your money back. Simply give us a call at 1‑888‑ZOETIS1 and we’ll take care of you.

Download complete Satisfaction Guarantee

bulldog licking woman's face

Ticks and fleas—small pests, big problem

Ticks and fleas can bug your dog year-round.10 Some can even put your dog’s health in danger.11

Good for your dog! Bad for us!

Remind me about Simparica dosing

To make sure your dog is always protected from ticks and fleas, it’s important to give your dog their tasty Simparica chewable at the same time every month.

We offer free monthly reminder emails and/or text messages to help you remember when it’s time for the next dose.

Sign up for Monthly Reminders

Simparica Frequently Asked Questions

Important Safety Information: Simparica is for use only in dogs, 6 months of age and older. Simparica may cause abnormal neurologic signs such as tremors, unsteadiness, and/or seizures. Simparica has not been evaluated in dogs that are pregnant, breeding, or lactating. Simparica has been safely used in dogs treated with commonly prescribed vaccines, parasiticides, and other medications. The most frequently reported adverse reactions were vomiting and diarrhea. See full Prescribing Information.


*Studies show that Simparica starts killing fleas in 3 hours and ticks in 8 hours.8

Program Terms and Conditions apply.

References:
  1. Six RH, Everett WR, Young DR, et al. Efficacy of a novel oral formulation of sarolaner (Simparica™) against five common tick species infesting dogs in the United States. Vet Parasitol. 2016;222:28-32.
  2. Six RH, Liebenberg J, Honsberger NA, Mahabir SP. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) and afoxolaner (NexGard®) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:90.
  3. Six RH, Young DR, Holzmer SJ, Mahabir SP. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) and afoxolaner (NexGard®) against induced infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. on dogs. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:91.
  4. Six RH, Liebenberg J, Honsberger NA, Mahabir SP. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) and fluralaner (Bravecto®) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:92.
  5. Becskei C, Geurden T, Liebenberg J, Cuppens O, Mahabir SP, Six RH. Comparative speed of kill of oral treatments with Simparica™ (sarolaner) and Bravecto® (fluralaner) against induced infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus on dogs. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:103.
  6. Six RH, Everett WR, Myers MR, Mahabir SP. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) and spinosad plus milbemycin oxime (Trifexis®) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs. Parasit Vectors. 2016;9:93.
  7. Six RH, Geurden T, Carter L, et al. Evaluation of the speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) against induced infestations of three species of ticks (Amblyomma maculatum, Ixodes scapularis, Ixodes ricinus) on dogs. Vet Parasitol. 2016;222:37-42.
  8. Honsberger NA, Six RH, Heinz TJ, et al. Efficacy of sarolaner in the prevention of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum transmission from infected Ixodes scapularis to dogs. Vet Parasitol. 2016;222:67-72.
  9. NexGard [package insert], Duluth, GA: Merial; 2015.
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Geographic distribution of ticks that bite humans. http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/geographic_distribution.html. Updated June 1, 2015. Accessed March 19, 2019.
  11. Blagburn BL, Dryden MW. Biology, treatment, and control of flea and tick infestations. Vet Clin Small Anim. 2009;39(6):1173-1200.
  12. How ticks spread disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/life_cycle_and_hosts.html. Updated January 10, 2019. Accessed March 19, 2019.
  13. Little SE. Changing paradigms in understanding transmission of canine tick-borne diseases: the role of interrupted feeding and intrastadial transmission. In: Proceedings of the 2nd Canine Vector-Borne Disease (CVBD) Symposium; April 25-28, 2007; Sicily, Italy.
  14. Fleas, ticks & your pet. Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) website. http://www.petsandparasites.org/images/uploads/documents/BC-3844_CAPC_FleaTick_one-color_04.pdf. Updated March 2011. Accessed March 25, 2019.
  15. Ticks: What are the risks in northern New England? University of Vermont Medical Center website. https://medcenterblog.uvmhealth.org/infectious-disease/ticks-northern-new-england. Updated August 23, 2018. Accessed March 25, 2019.
  16. Flea Allergy Dermatitis in Cats and Dogs. Vet Street website. http://www.vetstreet.com/care/flea-allergy-dermatitis-in-cats-and-dogs. Updated April 22, 2014. Accessed March 21, 2019.

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